Healthy Entrepreneurs

Workplace Stress and Mortality: Are They Related?

Posted on 12 Aug 2014 | Author Stefanie | Comments No comments | Tags

, , , ,

Workplace Stress and Mortality: Are They Related? Workplace pressures continue to be a major source of stress for the average adult. Studies remain conclusive that job related stress has escalated progressively over the last decade as more and more workers report experiencing less control and more demands. This model of scientific study – high demands, little employee control – concludes what the working population has assumed for decades: that this class of workers is at the highest risk for cardiovascular disease.

As a matter of fact, a report published by the American Institute of Stress says that job related stress is more strongly associated with health complaints than family or financial issues. They also report that while 80 percent of workers say they experience workplace stress on a daily basis, nearly 40 percent of them admit they need help learning how to manage this stress.

It’s estimated that occupational pressures cost the U.S. industry over $300 billion each year in the way of absenteeism, diminished productivity, accidents, worker’s compensation awards and employee turnover.

Is unemployment the cause of premature aging in men?

Another aspect of job related stress is unemployment. It’s not often a side of the job-coin that is looked at, however, studies show that long-term unemployment can prove to be even more stressful than having a stress-related job.

Over the last decade, British and Finnish researchers have been studying the effects of young men – an average age of 31 — who’ve remained unemployed for 500 or more days. Their study results show that the stress of long-term joblessness in these men may be the reason for their advanced aging.

Their study included 2,713 men and 2,907 women, all of whom had their blood work tested and controlled variables taken into consideration. Study results showed that the men who were without work for significant periods of time – 500 or more days – had a substantially increased risk of suffering a shorter life span. On the other hand, there was no such effect for women. Women who participated in the study were rarely unemployed for 500 days, while others spent time on their family.

Researchers for this study wrote, “The stress resulting from long-term unemployment appeared to be of key importance. Unemployment has been linked with numerous poor health outcomes including mortality, and now also with shorter telomere length, a potential biomarker of premature aging.”

There have been additional studies over the past 10 years that also showed positive connections between accelerated aging and stress. Medical researchers have known for decades that stress plays a key role, not only in cardiovascular disease, but also in depression, psychological distress and infection, all of which results in higher overall mortality. These studies could be a warning about the future of our health as it’s affected by both social and economic stress.


About the Author: Stefanie Hartman is an International Speaker, Mentor and Marketing Your Expertise Consultant. She is the founder of the home study program http://www.StopTradingYourTimeForMoneyOnlineProgram.com that teaches people how to discover their expertise and redefine their life & income through specific monetization strategies. She is also the Host of the TV Show “Big Ideas-Bite Sized. There is Power in 15 Mins” For more info visit: http://www.stefaniehartman.com

Photo Source: courtesy of David Castillo Dominici / Free Digital Photos

©Stefanie Hartman Enterprises Inc. You may republish this article, if you keep the article intact as is and credit the authors name and website: “Stefanie Hartman” and website: www.stefaniehartman.com. Thank you.

Popularity: 1% [?]

Stress Busters

Stress Busters

Posted on 22 Aug 2013 | Author Stefanie | Comments No comments

Stress BustersEpidemic is not too strong a word to describe the rates of stress we are currently seeing in the United States. More and more Americans live much of their time in a constant state of stress and anxiety, leading to fatigue, depression, burnout, and physical illness. A Gallup poll reports that up to 25 % of the American workforce suffers from excess stress or anxiety. Any change in your environment can cause stress, whether related to work, finances, relationships, or lifestyle. Even positive change can be stressful.

15 % of the U.S. population has had an anxiety disorder, and, according to the National Commission on Sleep Disorders, one in five Americans suffer from stress-related insomnia. The conventional medical treatment for stress, anxiety and insomnia consists of prescription drugs, usually Valium, Xanax, and Klonopin, or other highly addictive “ benzodiazepines.”

A modern office worker afraid of being chewed out by the boss experiences many of the same physiological events as a caveman of 50,000 years ago about to be chewed on by a saber-toothed tiger. The “fight or flight” response, the complex set of physical and psychological responses we call “stress”, erupts spontaneously in a human body mobilized for danger. Just as the caveman could only see two options — fight or flight, the chronic stress that pervades our lives limits our vision in every way, narrowing our view of what’s possible in our jobs, our relationships and our society.

At the same time, many of us believe that we can’t afford to give up our stress level, for fear that we would lose our “edge”. We put off relaxing until we complete the next project, contract, or term paper. However, research shows that a state of relaxed alertness allows us to work better and smarter. True health involves both mind and body. The workaholic style, based on pushing ourselves “just a little harder” is not the answer.

Our bodies pay a steep price for the years of stress. Sixty-percent of doctor visits are connected to stress and the physical ailments it can cause, and the cost to business is estimated at $50-75 billion dollars a year. Modern research shows that stress is a major contributor to our most pernicious diseases — heart disease, high blood pressure, arthritis and cancer. Yet medicine as a whole has failed to deal effectively in the prevention of these conditions. The best it can do is treat the symptoms, with little focus on the underlying causes. Faced with soaring costs, the frustrations of managed care, and the failure of modern medicine to provide adequate solutions to critical health problems, Americans are seeking alternative solutions in ever-increasing numbers.

There is now a marked trend toward the use of natural substances rather than drugs in the treatment of stress, anxiety, and insomnia. A significant advantage of herbs , or “phytomedicines” over the targeted “magic bullet” effects of synthetic drugs is that herbs are complex combinations of many ingredients with multiple actions. This increases the beneficial effects while reducing possible side effects.

Valerian, St John’s Wort, and More

Valerian is a familiar natural tranquilizer.

Anxiety is often combined with depression, making the natural antidepressant , St. John’s Wort, particularly useful. Besides enhancing the mood elevating chemical messengers (neurotransmitters) such as serotonin, it also has a calming effect, likely due to its action on the benzodiazepine receptor sites in the brain. Research shows it to be often as effective as prescription antidepressants, but without their side effects. There is no addiction or withdrawal, or problem when combined with alcohol, nor are there any accompanying food restrictions.

Siberian Ginseng known as an adaptogen helps the body cope with stress. It will support the adrenal glands, an essential part of our stress-fighting system that often becomes depleted.

Various vitamins and minerals are likewise needed, especially the B-vitamins, and the minerals, calcium, magnesium, and potassium which are all depleted during stress. B vitamins are required for the smooth running of the nervous system, and the production of adrenal hormones. The minerals have a relaxing effect on the body and emotions.

Supplements, however, are not a substitute for a proper diet, and good diet helps to balance our moods and energy. We are “running on empty” if we do not replenish our stores of raw material that run our inner chemical factory.

Add lifestyle enhancers such as meditation, exercise, massage, and other types of self-care for a well-rounded stress-reduction program. In many cases, exercise alone goes a long way toward enhancing mood, calming anxiety, and overcoming insomnia. The combination of all of the above, from herbs to diet and exercise to specific anti-stress techniques, can lead you out of the stress trap and into a more relaxed, healthy, and fulfilling lifestyle.

Article Author: Hyla Cass M.D. is a physician practicing integrative medicine and psychiatry. She combines the best of natural medicine with modern science in her clinical practice and appears regularly on TV, radio, and has been quoted in many national magazines. A member of the Medical Advisory Board of the Health Sciences Institute and Taste for Life Magazine, she is also Associate Editor of Total Health Magazine, she has served on the boards of California Citizens for Health and the American College for Advancement in Medicine (ACAM). She graduated from the University of Toronto School of Medicine, interned at Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center, and completed a psychiatric residency at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center/UCLA. She is the author of several popular books including: Natural Highs, 8 Weeks to Vibrant Health, and Supplement your Prescription: What Your Doctor Doesn’t Know About Nutrition.

Article References:
National Commission on Sleep Disorders
http://www.gallup.com/home.aspx

Article Image: Microsoft Clip Art

Popularity: 2% [?]

Kicking the Diet Soda Habit

Kicking the Diet Soda Habit

Posted on 22 Aug 2013 | Author Stefanie | Comments No comments

Kicking the Diet Soda HabitWe have all heard heard that diet soda isn’t good for us, but we love it and just can’t seem to give it up!

There are many good reasons to stop drinking diet soda. Research from the University of Texas Health Science Center showed that people who consumed more than three diet sodas per day, on average, had almost double the risk of becoming overweight or obese over an eight year period than those who didn’t drink artificially sweetened beverages. A Harvard study found that women who regularly drank two or more diet sodas per day were at increased risk for kidney function decline. Also, the phosphorus in diet soda can deplete the body’s calcium. Aspartame, the artificial sweetener used in many diet sodas, appears to act as an excitotoxin (an agent that binds to nerve cell receptors, overstimulating and damaging cells). I’ve seen patients with jitters, insomnia and disordered thinking recover when they stopped drinking diet soda! Many experts, including me, consider aspartame addictive—so I am not surprised that you are having trouble giving it up.

To reduce cravings for diet soda, try supplementing with the amino acids phenylananine and tyrosine. Why this works: Aspartame contains phenylalanine…which the body converts to tyrosine…which is then converted to the feel-good neurotransmitter dopamine (that’s one reason why you enjoy diet soda). When you take these amino acids directly, you get the same pleasing effects as you would from aspartame—but without diet soda’s negative effects.

Article Author: Hyla Cass M.D. is a physician practicing integrative medicine and psychiatry. She combines the best of natural medicine with modern science in her clinical practice and appears regularly on TV, radio, and has been quoted in many national magazines. A member of the Medical Advisory Board of the Health Sciences Institute and Taste for Life Magazine, she is also Associate Editor of Total Health Magazine, she has served on the boards of California Citizens for Health and the American College for Advancement in Medicine (ACAM). She graduated from the University of Toronto School of Medicine, interned at Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center, and completed a psychiatric residency at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center/UCLA. She is the author of several popular books including: Natural Highs, 8 Weeks to Vibrant Health, and Supplement your Prescription: What Your Doctor Doesn’t Know About Nutrition.

Article References:
University of Texas Health Science Center

Article Image: Microsoft Clip Art

Popularity: 2% [?]

Healthy Solutions to the Caffeine Trap

Healthy Solutions to the Caffeine Trap

Posted on 22 Aug 2013 | Author Stefanie | Comments No comments

Healthy Solutions to the Caffeine TrapStimulants have been around the block a few times. Since prehistory, people have used a variety of substances to energize, motivate, and inspire. They may be popular, but stimulants also cause problems. They all work by mimicking or triggering the release of the three primary chemical messengers or neurotransmitters: dopamine, adrenaline, and noradrenaline. That’s what makes us feel motivated and high.

Found in more than one hundred plants throughout the world, caffeine is consumed primarily in beverages. A half-dozen caffeine-containing plants are more widely used than all other herbal materials combined!

More than a thousand years ago, Muslims used coffee for religious rituals. Finally reaching Europe in the seventeenth century, it was seen by the authorities as a dangerous drug. Nonetheless, coffeehouses spread, as did dependence on this new drug. The rest is history. Together with tea, it comprises 97 percent of worldwide caffeine consumption. Some parts of the world use other forms of caffeine—guarana, maté, and kola nut—which are now becoming more popular in the West.

Caffeine was first isolated from coffee in 1821. The effects of coffee are more potent than those of caffeine alone, since it contains two other stimulants—theophylline and theobromine. These weaker versions of caffeine are also found in decaffeinated coffee.

Let’s take a look at your response to a cup of coffee:
• Within minutes, you feel more alert and focused.
• Your mood may improve, and your memory may seem a bit sharper.
• You might also begin to feel jittery.
• You may soon have the urge to urinate. (Coffee is a diuretic.)
• In an hour or two, you might notice yourself feeling down, foggy, and drowsy, and even irritable or cranky. You will probably start to crave another cup of coffee.

We drink caffeine to boost our mood and energy. We feel alert, motivated, and stimulated, until reaches its peak concentration in 30–60 minutes, after which it is inactivated by the liver. After 4–6 hours. only half its peak level is left.
So where’s the danger? Caffeine is addictive. Research shows that consuming as little as 100 mg a day can lead to withdrawal symptoms when you stop, which include headache, fatigue, difficulty concentrating, and drowsiness. It’s worth knowing that, while a small cup of instant coffee may contain less than 100 mg of caffeine, a large cup of “designer” coffee can contain as much as 500 mg—five times the “addictive” dose. Even more chemicals are used in manufacturing decaffeinated coffee, and, in the end, it still contains traces of caffeine—about 0.5 mg per 8-ounce cup.

Downsides of Caffeine
• Overstimulated central nervous system, leading to increased risk of heart attacks, irritability, insomnia, and rapid and irregular heartbeats.
• Elevated blood pressure (hypertension).
• Elevated blood-sugar and cholesterol levels.
• Heartburn and other gastrointestinal problems.
• Fibrocystic breast disease.
• Diuresis (excessive urination), which can lead to dehydration.
• Increased risk of birth defects if used during pregnancy.
• Contains tars, phenols, and other carcinogens, as well as traces of pesticides and toxic chemicals used in the growing and extraction processes.

At best, we can say that coffee has minor short-term mental and emotional benefits but they are not sustained. A study published in the American Journal of Psychiatry observed 1,500 psychology students divided into four categories depending on their coffee intake: abstainers; low consumers (1 cup or equivalent a day); moderate (1–5 cups a day); and high (5 cups or more a day). On psychological testing, the moderate and high consumers had higher levels of anxiety and depression than the abstainers, and the high consumers had higher incidence of stress-related medical problems coupled with lower academic performance.

Instead of coffee, we have a wide variety of natural substances that supply the immediate boost of coffee but without the negative side effects. Rather, they enhance our productions of neurotransmitters, working with the body’s design rather than against it. Here are some of my favorites:

  • DL-phenylalanine (DPLA): an amino acid, and precursor for tyrosine, which converts dopamine, adrenaline, and noradrenaline. It not only enhances mood and promotes energy, but also relieves pain and controls appetite.
  • Tyrosine: A precursor to the stimulating neurotransmitters dopamine, adrenaline, noradrenaline, and thyroid hormone, thyroxine, it has been used by the military to improve mental and physical performance under stress. Tyrosine enhances mood, energy and motivation.
  • Rhodiola. Grown in the Arctic regions of Siberian, it is known as Arctic root and improves concentration, stress resistance, physical performance, and mood.
  • NADH, or nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, is a small organic molecule found naturally in every living cell and plays a key role in energy production. Among its many benefits, it improves mental clarity, cellular memory, alertness, and concentration.
  • Coenzyme Q10: stimulates cellular production of energy, is a good antioxidant, enhances energy and endurance.
  • Siberian, Asian, and American ginseng: supports the adrenal glands, increases immediate energy, restores vitality, energy, and endurance over time, increases mental and physical performance.
  • Ashwaganda: both energizes and calms, enhances libido, memory, and cognition.
  • Licorice: improves adrenal function, which makes you feel more vital and motivated.
  • Reishi mushroom: stabilizes adrenal hormones, both calms and energizes, sharpens mental function

Why not boost your energy naturally, with nutrients that rebuild your brain chemistry rather than deplete it?

Article Author: Hyla Cass M.D. is a physician practicing integrative medicine and psychiatry. She combines the best of natural medicine with modern science in her clinical practice and appears regularly on TV, radio, and has been quoted in many national magazines. A member of the Medical Advisory Board of the Health Sciences Institute and Taste for Life Magazine, she is also Associate Editor of Total Health Magazine, she has served on the boards of California Citizens for Health and the American College for Advancement in Medicine (ACAM). She graduated from the University of Toronto School of Medicine, interned at Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center, and completed a psychiatric residency at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center/UCLA. She is the author of several popular books including: Natural Highs, 8 Weeks to Vibrant Health, and Supplement your Prescription: What Your Doctor Doesn’t Know About Nutrition.

Article References:
http://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/journal.aspx?journalid=13

Article Image: Microsoft Clip Art

Popularity: 2% [?]

Top Tips for Natural Energy a Boost

Top Tips for a Natural Energy Boost

Posted on 22 Aug 2013 | Author Stefanie | Comments No comments

Top Tips for a Natural Energy BoostWhen you understand the connection between energy and nutrition, it will be easier to incorporate these principles into your own life. Remember, too, that the neurotransmitters are produced by you, in your own brain, enabling you to enhance the process and produce your very own natural highs. In addition to feeding your brain with the right nutrients, positive thoughts go a long way toward raising your “happy” brain chemicals. Our mind-power is a remarkable and often untapped resource in our search for happiness.

Here are my top tips for sustained energy and positive feelings, and to deal with that end-of–the-day lag:

1. Good food: Eat a natural and healthy diet, with enough protein and good fats. Avoid sugar, caffeine and alcohol, which are all energy drains. Described in more detail in Natural Highs under “Natural Highs Basics”, and in 8 Weeks to Vibrant Health.

2. Water: 8 glasses of pure water/day keeps us hydrated, and is essential to keep our complex chemistry operating efficiently.

3. Take a daily high quality multivitamin/mineral formula.

4. Take supplements that support neurotransmitter production.

5. Get sufficient sleep.

6. Take a bath with essential oils of lemon, eucalyptus, cinnamon, or peppermint dispersed in the water, or scent your room with them.

7. Maximize the light in your room with natural daylight.

8. Do aerobic exercise. Twenty minutes daily will do wonders for your energy level not to mention your mood. Yoga, t’ai chi, or any other form of movement will also add another dimension.

9. Turn on some stimulating music, and dance up a storm

Give your body the opportunity to rejuvenate itself with natural energy-enhancing products and activities, and you will be off and running. Feeling alive and alert, you’ll not only get more done but you’ll have more fun doing it.

Article Author: Hyla Cass M.D. is a physician practicing integrative medicine and psychiatry. She combines the best of natural medicine with modern science in her clinical practice and appears regularly on TV, radio, and has been quoted in many national magazines. A member of the Medical Advisory Board of the Health Sciences Institute and Taste for Life Magazine, she is also Associate Editor of Total Health Magazine, she has served on the boards of California Citizens for Health and the American College for Advancement in Medicine (ACAM). She graduated from the University of Toronto School of Medicine, interned at Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center, and completed a psychiatric residency at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center/UCLA. She is the author of several popular books including: Natural Highs, 8 Weeks to Vibrant Health, and Supplement your Prescription: What Your Doctor Doesn’t Know About Nutrition.

Article References:

Article Image: Microsoft Clip Art

Popularity: 1% [?]

Good Mood Food

Quick Good Mood Food

Posted on 22 Aug 2013 | Author Stefanie | Comments No comments

Quick Good Mood FoodWe often feel down (low energy, depressed, and/or foggy-brained) because of a drop in blood sugar! Since that is the fuel that runs your glucose-hungry brain, you can remedy that feeling with a dose of carbohydrate, the source of glucose. While a doughnut may seems to work , it’s deceptive: you get a quick sugar high, followed by a big dip in blood glucose an hour or so later, and you are even worse off than before! On the other hand, a piece of fruit will provide higher quality glucose (blood sugar), and other phytonutrients (vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants). The fruit’s fiber helps the “sugar hit” to last longer in your system since it releases it’s sugar more gradually than refined sugar (eg a doughnut) or even fruit juice. Any whole grain will do the same.

Which brings us to sandwiches: a tuna, chicken, or cheese on whole grain brain — provides carbohydrate which is converted to glucose which fuels the brain. The combination also helps activate serotonin, a calming feel-good neurotransmitter(chemical messenger); Meat, fish, dairy, soy (tofu) provide protein which is converted into the neurotransmitters, the chemical messengers, and carbs act like a ‘boat’ that carries the tryptophan right to the brain. There it’s converted to serotonin.

Here is the whole story:
Did you know that some foods have a mild tranquilizing effect, while others alleviate depression? Still others give you an energy lift and feeling of happiness that lasts for hours without bringing you down with a crash.

We call these Good Mood Foods.

Natural Highs: Supplements, Nutrition, and Mind/Body Techniques to Help You Feel Good All the Time (Penguin Putnam), presents the latest scientific findings about how mood, behavior, energy, and mental performance all depend on a variety of nutrients that both make up and fuel the brain, nervous system, and neurotransmitters.

By incorporating Good Mood Foods into your regular diet, you can calm jangled nerves and fight anxiety, achieve mental clarity and improve memory, beat the blues, and feel optimistic and energized. For example:

* Energy boosters: Foods that score below 50 on the glycemic index, or low-GI foods, are complex carbohydrates that release their energy-giving glucose into the bloodstream slowly, like a time-release stimulant. They improve your alertness, memory, energy levels, mental clarity, and moods, and enable you to cope with stress. Best foods: beans and legumes, yogurt and skim milk, plums, oranges, apples, pears, dried apricots, grapefruit, cherries, barley, peanuts, and whole grains.

* Natural blues busters: Foods that contain the essential amino acid tryptophan help your body produce serotonin, a neurotransmitter that, when depleted, causes depression and quarrelsomeness. Oxford University researchers fed female adults a diet devoid of tryptophan. Within just eight hours, the women began to feel depressed. Their mood improved as soon as tryptophan-containing foods were reintroduced into their diet without their knowledge. Best foods: fish, turkey, chicken, cottage cheese, avocados, bananas, and wheat germ.

* Happiness foods: Foods that contain omega-3 fatty acids, the “good fats” (also called essential fatty acids, or EFA’s for short) which your body cannot produce, support the activity of the good-mood neurotransmitter, serotonin. EFA’s provide the some of the building blocks that make your brain cells. As fats, they help you feel satisfied and cut cravings for the wrong kind of fatty foods, like chips and rich desserts. Best foods: seeds of hemp, pumpkin, and sunflower, flaxseeds, tuna, salmon, cod, and mackerel. Or a handful of nuts—cashews, filberts, walnuts or almonds.

* Tranquilizing foods: Foods that contain taurine, an amino acid that plays a major role in the brain as an inhibitory neurotransmitter, help calm an overstimulated or excited brain. Best sources: animal and fish protein, specifically organ meats such as beef or chicken liver. Foods such as turkey and milk are high in the amino acid tryptophan which produces the calming neurotransmitter, serotonin.

* Mind and memory boosters. Probably the single most common cause for declining memory is a deficiency in the brain chemical acetylcholine, which is derived from the nutrient choline. Eating rich sources of choline has been shown to dramatically improve mental clarity, alertness, retention, and comprehension. Eggs, sardines, and soy beans are major sources.

Article Author: Hyla Cass M.D. is a physician practicing integrative medicine and psychiatry. She combines the best of natural medicine with modern science in her clinical practice and appears regularly on TV, radio, and has been quoted in many national magazines. A member of the Medical Advisory Board of the Health Sciences Institute and Taste for Life Magazine, she is also Associate Editor of Total Health Magazine, she has served on the boards of California Citizens for Health and the American College for Advancement in Medicine (ACAM). She graduated from the University of Toronto School of Medicine, interned at Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center, and completed a psychiatric residency at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center/UCLA. She is the author of several popular books including: Natural Highs, 8 Weeks to Vibrant Health, and Supplement your Prescription: What Your Doctor Doesn’t Know About Nutrition.

Article References:

Article Image: Microsoft Clip Art

Popularity: 3% [?]

Reclaim Your Energy!

Reclaim Your Energy

Posted on 22 Aug 2013 | Author Stefanie | Comments No comments

Reclaim Your EnergyDo you have less overall energy than you’d like?  Do you have trouble getting up in the morning, or run out of steam part way through the day?

We have an energy crisis and many of the solutions are worse than the problem. I’ll help you to understand why you may be having these problems, and give some natural solutions you can do on your own.

Welcome to the non-stop 21st century, with impossible schedules as we juggle work, home, and family responsibilities. We’re often running on empty too – with insufficient sleep and inadequate nutrition. The Standard American Diet (well-named “SAD” for short) is full of nutrient-deficient refined foods that are simply not able to sustain us properly.

The Stimulant Rollercoaster

We have our quick fixes: sugar, caffeine, nicotine, and even drugs, legal and otherwise, may give us a temporary boost. They trigger the emotional center of the brain, called the limbic system, to release the pleasure molecule, dopamine. But there is no free lunch here.

These highs evaporate all too quickly, often leaving us to cope with their nasty aftermath — mood swings, emotional depletion, physical exhaustion, and even addiction. We feel even worse than before we started! It’s not simply that the positive effect wears off, but we now have to cope with a reaction called down-regulation. Nature’s way of maintaining balance is by quickly shutting down some receptors in the brain, thereby dampening the effects of the excessive dopamine release. As a result, we need more of the stimulant, more frequently, to get the same good feelings and high energy that we did initially.

We even get hooked on our own inner chemicals! Ever think of yourself as a “stress junkie,” finding it hard to chill on a weekend or while on vacation? Stress, just like stimulants, activates your adrenals glands, the two almond- shaped stress organs perched atop our kidneys. They release the stress hormones, adrenaline and cortisol, which promote the release of dopamine. While this is Mother Nature’s way of helping us deal with pain, it can also lead to an addiction to stress itself! The adrenals ultimately become exhausted and no longer able to respond — and neither are you. So, turning to stimulants to rev up your engine will only further deplete an already bankrupt system.

The Truth about Stimulants

  • Caffeine — Caffeine is what gives coffee, tea, and other beverages their “kick.” But caffeine is addictive and packs some heavy withdrawal symptoms (fatigue, headache, irritability, to name a few). Also, because it over-stimulates your nervous system, caffeine can cause a rapid or irregular heartbeat, and increases your risk of high blood pressure and heart attacks.
  • Refined sugar — Grabbing a sweet snack for a quick pick-me-up taxes your system. Your cells struggle to process an overload of sugar that hits your bloodstream much faster than more complex natural varieties such as that found in fruit. Once the rush is gone, you crash into a low-blood-sugar malaise — and crave more. Your arteries, nerves, kidneys, and eyes can suffer from this sugar roller-coaster, and you are at increased risk for developing diabetes, an increasing epidemic in our society.
  • Chocolate — Don’t assume it’s only the sugar and caffeine in that truffle that’s picking you up. Cocoa, the main ingredient, contains some highly addictive stimulants. These can cause you to crave more sugar-and caffeine-filled chocolate, with all the attendant health risks.
  • Nicotine — A powerful poison, nicotine is proven to be more addictive than heroin. As the primary stimulant in cigarettes, nicotine works in a similar way to caffeine. However, along with this energizing “jolt” come high risks for cancer and heart disease.
  • Amphetamines — Prescribed for years as “diet pills”, these powerful drugs spawned a generation of “speed” addicts in the 50s and 60s. Aside from the serious withdrawal symptoms, amphetamines raise heart rate and increase your risk of heart attack.

Our Brain on Natural Highs

You can start to regain your energy and enthusiasm for life through eating the right nutrients  starting with the basics: carbohydrates, fats and proteins.

Carbohydrate is converted into glucose (blood sugar) which is burned in the cells as fuel to create energy. It is important to eat complex, fiber-laden carbohydrates that burn slowly instead of refined sugars which give you a quick sugar high followed by a crash.

“Good fats”
such as those found in fatty fish (salmon, mackerel), or in flax oil help make up the brain cells, which are 70% fat. ‘Bad fats’ such as hydrogenated oils and those found in fried foods will actually interfere with healthy brain cell formation.

Protein, found in eggs, fish, meat, or vegetarian sources such as tofu, is broken down into its component amino acids. With the help of vitamins and minerals, these are then turned into  “neurotransmitters” or chemical messengers.

Neurotransmitters

There are hundreds of different neurotransmitters in a healthy body. Most of them are specialized: Dopamine and adrenaline increase our energy and alertness, helping us respond to stress. The endorphins, our natural morphine, can make us euphoric. Serotonin is both calming and mood –elevating.  Acetylcholine drives our memory. GABA balances and relaxes us.

Traveling across tiny gaps or synapses between neurons (nerve cells) in our brains and bodies, the neurotransmitters send an electrical message down the line to the next neuron, and so on until the signal reaches the intended destination —perhaps a muscle or nerve.

Nutritional deficiencies hamper the body’s ability to produce enough of the right neurotransmitters, making you feel lethargic and run down.  Even with a fairly good diet, you often need a further energy boost. This may be due to your own genetic make-up, a nutrient-deficient diet, a toxic environment, or simply, the increased demands of daily life.

Fortunately there are a number of safe and well-researched supplements — vitamins, minerals, herbs and amino acids –that can do the trick. Unlike other energizers that give you only a quick fix, the right nutrients actually help your body to increase the production of neurotransmitters.

Essential Cofactors: Vitamins and Minerals

The respected New England Journal of Medicine recommended that for optimum health and nutrition, besides eating a nutrient-rich diet, we need to take a daily multivitamin.

What is so important about vitamins and minerals?

Here is some convincing research on vitamin-power. Ninety students were assigned to one of three groups: one received a multivitamin and mineral supplement; the second, an identical-looking placebo (dummy pill); and the third, nothing. After seven months, the IQ of those taking the supplements had increased by a staggering nine points! An increase of only five points would get half the learning disabled children out of special schools and back to normal schooling.

A high-potency multivitamin and mineral formula should form the basis of your supplement program, supplying adequate amounts of vitamins A, B, C, D, E, and assorted minerals – calcium, magnesium, iron, zinc, manganese, chromium, and other trace minerals. They act as essential co-factors, or chemical helpers, in manufacturing your neurotransmitters. Without their help, the transformation of amino acids into neurotransmitters could not take place. The family of B vitamins protect you against depression, anxiety, stress, fatigue, mental dullness, and emotional fragility, and even boost your IQ.

Take extra antioxidants, such as 1000 mg of vitamin C and 400 I.U. of vitamin E. Add some essential fatty acids (1 gm of fish oil or flax oil) to further support brain and hormonal function.

If your fatigue (and the resultant stimulant cravings) lasts more than several weeks, it could be due to other causes, such as poor sleep and diet, chronic infection, and hormonal imbalances, such as underactive thyroid or adrenal glands, as discussed in more depth in my book, 8 Weeks to Vibrant Health. Consulting your healthcare provider first to check this out. Then, if your doctor can find no reason for your feeling tired, seek out professional advice on dietary, exercise, and nutritional alternatives.

Article Author: Hyla Cass M.D. is a physician practicing integrative medicine and psychiatry. She combines the best of natural medicine with modern science in her clinical practice and appears regularly on TV, radio, and has been quoted in many national magazines. A member of the Medical Advisory Board of the Health Sciences Institute and Taste for Life Magazine, she is also Associate Editor of Total Health Magazine, she has served on the boards of California Citizens for Health and the American College for Advancement in Medicine (ACAM). She graduated from the University of Toronto School of Medicine, interned at Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center, and completed a psychiatric residency at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center/UCLA. She is the author of several popular books including: Natural Highs, 8 Weeks to Vibrant Health, and Supplement your Prescription: What Your Doctor Doesn’t Know About Nutrition.

Article Resources:
Oakley, G. P. “Eat right and take a multivitamin.” New England Journal of Medicine (9 Apr. 1998): 1060–61.
Benton, D. “Effect of vitamin and mineral supplementation on intelligence of a sample of school children.” Lancet 1 (1988): 140–44.
James, J. “Acute and chronic effects of caffeine on performance, mood, headache, and sleep.” Neuropsychobiology 38 (1998): 32–42.

Article Image: Microsoft Clip Art

Popularity: 1% [?]

Are Cell Phones and Wi-Fi Hazardous to Your Health?

Posted on 06 Aug 2013 | Author Stefanie | Comments No comments

Are Cell Phones and Wi Fi Hazardous to Your Health?You may not be able to see electropollution, but your body responds to it as though it were a cloud of toxic chemicals.”
–Ann Louse Gittleman, author of “
Zapped: Why Your Cell Phone Shouldn’t Be Your Alarm Clock and 1,268 Ways to Outsmart the Hazards of Electronic Pollution”

The latest form of environmental pollution — and one that industry, government and wireless consumers don’t like to acknowledge — may be the most devastating threat to health yet: electromagnetic fields (EMFs). A few years ago, I was so concerned that I took a certification course in the detection and harmful effects of EMFs. What it taught me, above all, was how much the scientific community is learning daily, and how little we in the medical profession knew. This area was both frightening and daunting in its scope. I’m grateful that following Devra Davis’s Disconnect: The Truth About Cell Phone Radiation we now have Zapped to educate the public on this serious issue.

The UK’s BioInitiative Report of July 2007 (updated in 2009) describes hundreds of studies that link EMF exposure to Alzheimer’s disease, ALS (Lou Gehrig’s disease), brain fog, cardiovascular disease, miscarriage, infertility, insomnia, learning impairment, as well as anxiety and depression. Wireless technologies — like cell and cordless phones — produce microwaves that increase the permeability of the blood-brain barrier, leading to changes in brain chemistry. Even low-level EMFs can cause brain cells to leak.

That’s not all: Although actual tissue heating does not occur, EMFs also cause breaks in DNA, speed up cell division, disrupting the orderly process of chromosome matching and detaching, and activate stress protein or heat shock proteins. And as Anne Louise Gittleman writes in Zapped:

Most disturbing of all, the Swedish National Institute for Working Life found that people using cell phones for 2,000 hours — a total most of us could easily rack up over the years — had a 240 percent increased risk for malignant brain tumors on the side of the head where they usually held their phone.

So, what do we do to avoid these dangers? I’m relieved that Gittleman, my friend and colleague and author of over 30 bestselling books, has tackled this topic. We’ll learn that most of us don’t need to give up all the digital and electronic gadgets that make life so much easier. To protect ourselves, we first need to recognize the risks and then make smart choices in how we use all the available technological wonders.

Why Are EMFs So Dangerous?

What most people don’t realize is the human body is naturally electrified. From the organic computer that is your brain, which sends out sensory messages like hunger and pain, to the energy that pumps your heart and makes your muscles contract, electricity powers your body. This innate electromagnetism within you is so critical to your daily functioning that modern medicine uses it in diagnostic testing (including electrocardiograms and MRIs) and, increasingly, to heal.

The “body electric” is an exquisitely tuned and sensitive creation, but unfortunately, human beings (and animals) respond favorably to only a very small range of electromagnetic frequencies. And there’s a big difference between the body’s natural electricity and the man-made electromagnetic frequencies that surround us 24/7 today. According to New York Times reporter B. Blake Levitt in Public Health SOS:

Most living things are fantastically sensitive to vanishingly small EMF exposures. Living cells interpret such exposures as part of our normal cellular activities (think heartbeats, brainwaves, cell division itself, etc.) The problem is, man-made electromagnetic exposures aren’t “normal.” They are artifacts, with unusual intensities, signaling characteristics, pulsing patterns, and wave forms. And they can misdirect cells in myriad ways.

Some of this radiation — extremely low frequency (ELF) radiation in power lines, the radio frequency (RF)/microwave range where all things wireless live, intermediate frequencies (“dirty electricity” or freaky frequencies linked to sick building syndrome), and the highest frequencies (gamma and X-rays) — is more damaging than natural frequencies to which humans (and animals) have adapted over millennia. Today, most Americans are constantly exposed to artificial frequencies, given the rapidly escalating pace of microwave and wireless expansion.

The bottom line is that electropollution — from cell towers, computers, cordless and mobile phones, PDAs, Wi-Fi, even the electrical appliances and wiring in our homes, offices and public buildings — continuously disturbs the sympathetic nervous system. This, in turn, elevates the body’s fight-and-flight response, raising levels of the stress hormone cortisol. Fluctuations in cortisol lead to a wide range of health concerns ranging from belly fat and thinning skin to accelerated aging, blood sugar imbalance, cardiovascular problems, erratic sleep patterns and mood disturbances. Dr. Stephen Sinatra elaborates on this issue in his new book, Earthing.

Your body responds to EMFs as though they were public enemy number-one, triggering what two-time Nobel Prize nominee Robert Becker, M.D., in his 1998 book The Body Electric, called “subliminal stress.” While intellectually you don’t recognize this kind of stealth stress the way you would overwork or being stuck in traffic when you’re late for an important appointment, your body’s internal antennae pick up on it in several ways, according the late scientist, Dr. W. R. Adey, from Loma Linda University:

  • The flow of blood and oxygen shuts down to all except major organs like the brain and heart.
  • Any systems — including digestion and immunity — that aren’t necessary for fight or flight response are put on hold.
  • Blood pressure and heart rate as well as blood sugar levels increase to prepare your body for danger.

Recent research by Magda Havas, Ph.D., associate professor of Environmental and Resource Studies at Trent University in Canada, shows that dirty electricity — EMFs in electrical wiring — can raise blood sugar levels in diabetics and people at risk for diabetes. “Exposure to electromagnetic pollution in its various forms may account for higher plasma glucose levels and contribute to the misdiagnosis of diabetes,” she writes. Dr. Havas’ website is a goldmine of information on the entire topic of EMF pollution, as is Dr. Mercola’s EMF site!

Electromagnetic Hypersensitivity

There are “canaries in the coal mine” — hypersensitive individuals who are severely weakened by EMFs, and find themselves marginalized by the medical profession and society in general. Some must live in areas far from cell towers, Wi-Fi and the like. On a cellular level, these individuals have measurable damage to the mitochondria, the energy factories in each cell, and require reparative nutrients, for starters. I recently heard from a concerned family member of a man who had been exposed over time to a cell tower beaming through his office window. Quite ill, he was nonetheless unwilling to move his office location as I suggested, and I didn’t hear from them again. Ignoring the messenger, however, doesn’t solve the problem.

Zap-Proof Your Children

Today, an estimated 31 millions kids are on their cell phones close to four hours a day. Mobile phone companies are even marketing phones to preschoolers. Gittleman writes:

The trouble is, kids absorb 50 percent more electropollution than adults. One study finds that a cell phone call lasting only two minutes can cause brain hyperactivity that lasts up to an hour in children. Because their skulls are smaller and thinner than adults, EMFs penetrate much deeper into children’s brains. Kids’ brains are also more conductive due to their higher water and ion concentration.

The Toronto Board of Health recommends that children under eight use cell phone only for emergencies and that teens limit calls to under 10 minutes. If your kids have cell phones, encourage them to use the same smart tips you do.

Smart Use of Technology

The good news is most of us don’t have to give up our smartphones if we use them wisely. Here are some of the many tips Gittleman highlights in Zapped:

  • Text, don’t talk, whenever possible.
  • Use speaker mode to keep your phone as far away from your head as possible.
  • Go offline — turn off your cell phone when you’re not using it and shut off your wireless router at night. (You’ll be amazed how much more soundly you’ll sleep.)
  • Get your phone out of the your pocket; men who carry their mobile there have lower sperm counts than those who don’t carry a cell phone.
  • Avoid tight spaces (buses, elevators, trains, and subways) where your phone has to work harder to get a signal out through metal.
  • Buy low, choosing a phone with a low SAR (specific absorption rate) number.
  • Replace your cordless phones with corded land line phones.
  • Don’t cradle your laptop–putting it on your lap exposes your reproductive organs to EMFs.
  • Most important of all, restrict cell and cordless phone use during pregnancy. Heavy phone use then has been linked to increased risk of miscarriage and birth defects. And a 2008 survey of more than 13,000 children found that those whose mothers used a cell phone during pregnancy were more likely to have behavior problems like hyperactivity and trouble controlling their emotions.

Don’t rely on the many stick-on devices available for your cell phone or computer that claim to protect you. Most are sold via network marketing, and I have yet to see the level of scientific proof that could convince me. You’ll likely see comments to this blog, advertising them. Caveat emptor!

Even if you go back to wired technologies at home, Wi-Fi is expanding rapidly into schools and other public buildings. If the telecommunications industry has its way, we will all be bathed in a sea of artificial radiation from nonstop EMF exposure.

Due to their lobbying efforts, Section 704 of the Telecommunications Act of 1996 makes state and local governments powerless to prohibit cell towers and wireless antennas based on “environmental (i.e., human) health concerns.” Write your congressmen and senators to change this legislation and to require the FCC to reduce exposure guidelines for EMFs.

Don’t wait for the government to protect you, though. Get your copy of Zapped and take action!

Article Author: Hyla Cass M.D. is a physician practicing integrative medicine and psychiatry. She combines the best of natural medicine with modern science in her clinical practice and appears regularly on TV, radio, and has been quoted in many national magazines. A member of the Medical Advisory Board of the Health Sciences Institute and Taste for Life Magazine, she is also Associate Editor of Total Health Magazine, she has served on the boards of California Citizens for Health and the American College for Advancement in Medicine (ACAM). She graduated from the University of Toronto School of Medicine, interned at Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center, and completed a psychiatric residency at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center/UCLA. She is the author of several popular books including: Natural Highs,         8 Weeks to Vibrant Health, and Supplement your Prescription: What Your Doctor Doesn’t Know About Nutrition.

Article Resources:
http://www.amazon.com/Zapped-Shouldnt-Outsmart-Electronic-Pollution/dp/0061864277
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/devra-davis-phd/brain-cancer-and-cell-pho_b_379601.html
http://www.amazon.com/Disconnect-Radiation-Industry-Protect-Family/dp/0525951946/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1286908749&sr=1-1
http://wifiinschools.org.uk/6.html
http://www.jstor.org/discover/10.2307/20485976?uid=3739400&uid=2&uid=3737720&uid=4&sid=21102532292683
http://arstechnica.com/uncategorized/2006/03/6502-2/
http://www.amazon.com/Public-Health-SOS-Wireless-Revolution/dp/1441458794
http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_i_2_27?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=earthing+by+stephen+sinatra&sprefix=earthing+by+stephen+sinatra
http://www.amazon.com/Body-Electric-Electromagnetism-Foundation-Life/dp/0688069711/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1286917726&sr=1-1
http://biolabor.hu/tudomanyos-anyagaink/
http://www.magdahavas.com/
http://emf.mercola.com/
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/hyla-cass-md/cell-phone-and-wifi-dange_b_758167.html
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18467962

Article Image: Microsoft Clip Art

Popularity: 19% [?]

A Good Night’s Sleep, Naturally

Posted on 06 Aug 2013 | Author Stefanie | Comments 1 comment | Tags

,

A Good Nights Sleep, NaturallyWhen was the last time you had a truly great night of sleep? One that you awoke from easily, refreshed, and ready to take on the world? Unfortunately for many people this is rare. Most people, at some point in their lives, find it hard to fall asleep, and sometimes to stay asleep through the entire night. In fact, a recent survey found that more people are sleeping less than six hours a night, and up to 75% of us deal with sleep difficulties at least a few nights each week.

If this sounds familiar, don’t worry. There has been a lot of new research around insomnia, and there are many solutions out there for a better night’s rest. The first step in figuring out what will work for you, is discovering what is causing your sleeplessness in the first place. The following are everyday things that can get in the way of your best sleep possible:

Lack of exercise: Our bodies are designed to move, and move a lot. Our survival has depended on physical activity for thousands of years, and we’re simply not designed to be sitting for hours at a time. So even if you feel like you’ve been running around all day, if your heart rate hasn’t been elevated for a certain length of time or you haven’t broken a sweat, your body will have a hard time shutting down at night. So an hour or so of exercise will go a long way towards a good night’s sleep, and also help reduce mental stress at the same time.

Racing thoughts: Let’s face it, between work, family, friends, and even watching the news, our brains get quite a work out. All this activity can make it hard to settle our thoughts at night, making it nearly impossible to fall asleep. To give your mind a break, try writing down your top five or ten stresses, both good and bad, before bed. This will help to relieve stress, and put your mind at ease for the night.

What you eat and when: These days sugar is everywhere, especially in processed foods- it’s hard to avoid, and causes a lot of health problems. It can also put your adrenal glands on a roller coaster ride, and bring your energy along. Other stimulants, like caffeine, or relaxants like alcohol, make it hard for our bodies to recognize patterns of rest and activity. These are all okay in moderation, but if you find yourself overdoing it, your sleep will be affected. For some, a morning cup of coffee can actually affect their night-time sleep!

Prescription drugs: Sleeplessness is a side effect of many prescription drugs, so talk to your doctor about your medications. Or look them up on-line, for starters. Even prescription sleep aids can cause problems over time. These drugs basically knock you unconscious, then rob you of your precious restorative REM sleep. They disturb your sleep in the long run and then you have to deal with drug withdrawal. So if you can address these common causes, turn the television off, take a warm bath (and even better, with some relaxing, magnesium-laden Epsom salts and calming lavender oil) and top it off with a little warm milk night cap, (yes, it really works!) you should be soon be sleeping soundly.

Natural Remedies: If you still have issues, then there are natural remedies, including amino acids: tryptophan, 5 –hyroxytryptophan (5 HTP), theanine; melatonin which is technically a hormone, and the herbs – valerian, passion flower, and lemon balm.

I developed a combination formula called Nightly Calm that’s been helpful for many insomniacs.

Article Author: Hyla Cass M.D. is a physician practicing integrative medicine and psychiatry. She combines the best of natural medicine with modern science in her clinical practice and appears regularly on TV, radio, and has been quoted in many national magazines. A member of the Medical Advisory Board of the Health Sciences Institute and Taste for Life Magazine, she is also Associate Editor of Total Health Magazine, she has served on the boards of California Citizens for Health and the American College for Advancement in Medicine (ACAM). She graduated from the University of Toronto School of Medicine, interned at Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center, and completed a psychiatric residency at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center/UCLA. She is the author of several popular books including: Natural Highs,        8 Weeks to Vibrant Health, and Supplement your Prescription: What Your Doctor Doesn’t Know About Nutrition.

Article Sources:
http://www.health.harvard.edu/press_releases/importance_of_sleep_and_health

Article Image: Microsoft Clip Art

Popularity: 1% [?]

Constant Cravings…Am I a Food Addict?

Posted on 06 Aug 2013 | Author Stefanie | Comments No comments | Tags

, ,

Constant Cravings…Am I a Food Addict?Every New Year’s Resolution and almost every Monday will start the same: new goals and fresh ambition to once again, eat right, eat less, exercise more and finally lose those unwanted pounds! The day starts off great with a healthy and nourishing breakfast, you make it pass lunchtime without any incidence, and then it happens: The stress and work begins to pile up and take its emotional toll and before you know it, all you can think about is sugary, high carbohydrate, calorie-laden foods. You think, “I’ll just have one” when you reach for that donut or chocolate chip cookie, or even, a bowl of spaghetti marinara. However, it doesn’t stop at one, or two or three…and before you know it you are left with an overly full stomach and feelings of shame, guilt and defeat, knowing that this isn’t the first time and will most likely not be the last time this scenario happens.

If this sounds all too familiar, it may be possible that you are battling a food addiction, where your brain is actually addicted to food making it almost impossible to break this vicious cycle without proper help. According to Dr. David Kessler, professor at UCSF and former commissioner of the FDA, there are more than 70 million food addicted adults in the United States alone, contributing to the obesity epidemic and rising costs of healthcare.

Just like the tobacco industry scandals, the food industry has built addictiveness into our chips and sodas and jumbo burgers. So dieting to lose weight won’t help, since you’ll be back eating it all (and regaining the weight) before you know it – unless you know how to change your brain!

I have spent many years in medical practice, helping to repair the damage done by poor food choices, unhealthy substances, and inadequate medical care to treat it. My approach to addiction is not that of mainstream or conventional medical care. No surprise here! I have been alarmed at the growing problems of addiction in all areas (food, drugs, medications, and activities) leading to a great deal of suffering by those directly and indirectly affected. The way it’s being treated, or not treated, has led me to write and speak on natural approaches to addiction whenever I can. I’m excited to share this information with you, so you can understand how addiction works insidiously on your brain, body, and every aspect of your life, and how you can take back control.

WHAT IS A FOOD ADDICTION?
A food addiction is characterized by an compulsive need to eat despite knowing negative consequences, such as weight gain and damaged relationships. Just like an addiction to drugs or gambling, no matter how much you try to stop your behavior, it usually just keeps happening. Eating triggers a feel-good brain chemical called dopamine that sends reward signals that may override feelings of fullness and satisfaction. This causes eating and overeating to occur without any hunger being present. What’s worse, you slowly develop a tolerance to food and will find that despite eating all that seductive food, it’s not as satisfying as it once was.

WHAT ARE THE SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF A FOOD ADDICTION?
Here are the most common signs and symptoms of food addiction:

-Weight gain.
-Eating more food than the body can physically tolerate.
-Continuing to eat past the point of feeling full.
-Eating in secret and seclusion.
-Heart palpitations.
-Taking extreme measures to obtain food.
-Decreased energy or extreme fatigue.
-Difficulty concentrating, insomnia, restlessness and general irritability.
-Suicidal thoughts.

HELP FOR FOOD ADDICTION
By definition, addiction is the continued use of a mood altering substance or behavior despite adverse consequences. Addiction in any form is a disease of the brain.

We know that food addiction is very real and the effects are detrimental to one’s life and ultimate happiness According to WebMd.com, recent experiments in animals and humans are showing that for some people, the same reward and pleasure centers of the brain that are triggered by addictive drugs like cocaine and heroin are also activated by food. Therefore, the trick to overcoming addiction is to restore and regulate normal neurotransmitter balance within the brain.

As an expert in the fields of integrative medicine, psychiatry and addiction recovery and author of “The Addicted Brain and How to Break Free”, Dr Hyla Cass knows there are natural solutions to this serious problem, and it’s not just “white-knuckling” it.  She has helped many to overcome this by re-balancing their brain chemistry with diet and natural supplements, thinking positively and adopting a healthy mind and mood lifestyle.

Article Author:  Hyla Cass M.D. is a physician practicing integrative medicine and psychiatry. She combines the best of natural medicine with modern science in her clinical practice and appears regularly on TV, radio, and has been quoted in many national magazines. A member of the Medical Advisory Board of the Health Sciences Institute and Taste for Life Magazine, she is also Associate Editor of Total Health Magazine, she has served on the boards of California Citizens for Health and the American College for Advancement in Medicine (ACAM). She graduated from the University of Toronto School of Medicine, interned at Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center, and completed a psychiatric residency at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center/UCLA. She is the author of several popular books including: Natural Highs,      8 Weeks to Vibrant Health, and Supplement your Prescription: What Your Doctor Doesn’t Know About Nutrition.

Article References:
http://www.webmd.com/mental-health/mental-health-food-addiction
http://www.addictionhope.com/food

Article Image: Microsoft Clip Art

Popularity: 1% [?]